Relocation Custody Agreement

In fact, it is not uncommon for the court to automatically assume that the move is not in the best interests of the child. Therefore, the parent who wishes to move with the child must convince the court of why a move would benefit the child, while the parent who does not move must prove that a move is not ideal. If a parent wishes to move with their child, the moving parent must have a plan before the trial date. For example, in cases of children moving, the parent requesting the move should be aware of possible schools and districts, as well as activities for the child at the new site. Ultimately, as with all custody arrangements, the decision of a parent entitled to the child must be made on the basis of the “best interests” of the child concerned. Managing issues related to children as a single parent or during divorce or separation involves complex legal issues that can have a serious impact on your parental rights. Before deciding when and where you take your children, it is therefore essential that you consult yourself personally through an experienced family law lawyer. This is especially true in the absence of a custody agreement or court order, as your rights are determined by previous legal laws and court orders. To determine whether a move is in the best interests of a child, some factors a judge may consider are: it is also important to note that custody is decided in the state where your divorce was filed (and where your child lived for the six months prior to the divorce), regardless of where you will live, you and the child. With regard to the increase in travel costs, some States require a apportionment of 50-50 in increased costs.

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